Search the site:

Home Blog Part 5: Online Marketplaces in Africa to Sell your Products

Part 5: Online Marketplaces in Africa to Sell your Products

This is part 5 in our series of posts on online marketplaces to sell in your product. The previous were as follows:

Part 1: Online Marketplaces to Sell in the US
Part 2: Online Marketplaces to Sell in Europe
Part 3: Online Marketplaces to Sell in Asia
Part 4: Online Marketplaces in the Middle East

Hitherto not featuring in the global e-commerce market, the 1-billion strong African continent is now beginning to find a footing in the digital space. With a growing young and middle class, greater internet penetration, reliance on phones and increase in credit card penetration, the online shopping space is gaining traction. If you want to sell in Africa, either from outside or within the continent, from one country to another, now is a good time.

Main markets include South Africa, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Egypt, Kenya, Uganda, and Cameroon. While brands and more luxury items like electronics and fashion work well, it is the design and handicrafts that really dominate, especially those that promote the cultures of the region.

In part five of our on going series, we bring to you, marketplaces to sell in Africa.

1. Afrikrea

From jewelry to clothing, bags and accessories, Afrikrea is the fashion store with a core African aesthetic with respect to prints and designs, while having a global appeal with respect to cuts and styles. This makes it perfect for young designers, boutiques and other professionals to open a shop on the portal.

There are no listing charges, an automated dashboard to manage listings and promotions and direct payment to you. This one is for African designers looking for a wider reach in the region and beyond it. The one caveat? You have to manage shipping yourself.

2. Kamers Makers

An online store for artisans and their handcrafted goods, Kamers Makers’ model is a little different. To sell here, you have to create a store on Shopstar first. So essentially, they give you a secondary platform to display the products and sell them to their niche audience.

You can sell all kinds of products, including jewelry, calendars, scarves, and more.

3. Zando

Apparels are clearly the fore-runners among products in Africa. Zando, the South-Africa based online store is perfect for distributors of relatively larger brands. You have to start by emailing them to get approved as a supplier. This means that you should have sufficiently large volumes of stock.

4. Zasttra

Zasttra is the online marketplace for a host of product categories including music, home appliances, sports equipment, cell phone accessories, jewelry, baby products among others. You can register to be a seller for free, but there is a monthly maintenance fee (R199) and commission charges that range from 8% to 18% depending on the product category. These are exclusive of any taxes that may be levied in the transaction.

Put together, your per product profit margins may reduce significantly when selling on Zasttra, but a whole new avenue should make up for it. They also have an easy WooCommerce integration, if you already have an online store.

5. Jumia

The Nigeria-based e-commerce platform is among the leading marketplaces in the region. It sells electronics, grocery, baby products, fashion & accessories, and even flights and rental spaces (classifieds).

To sell, you have to first register and undergo a training session. They promise a robust marketing and data analytics. Jumia also has a mobile app, which is the more important platform for e-commerce in Africa.

Commissions can be anywhere from 4.50% to 21% depending on product category. There are also shipping fees charged, which vary on the value of the commission. You can check details here.

6. Hello Pretty

Strictly for creative professionals working out of South Africa, Hello Pretty is the friend of our beloved gig economy. It allows you to sell products either made or designed by you. A big no to brands, they are all about encouraging local talent and handmade delights.

Storing and packing is on you, so is shipping. There is a payment processor fee and a commission on items sold. There is no monthly charge for a ‘Free’ signup, but services and features increase if you do sign up for the paid plans.

7. Takealot.com

A typical online marketplace, Takealot sells consumer goods in various categories. While listing products is free, there are a host of fees involved, including monthly subscription charges, a transaction or success fee calculated as a percentage of VAT, shipping or fulfillment fees depending on package size and weight, and storage fees, again depending on size and weight of the stock.

Combined, you are taking a big cut on profit margins. However, if you are selling in the region for the first time, this may be worth it. Because of the charges involved, it is only suitable for businesses with large volumes and preferably higher profits.

8. Konga

From electronics to wines (yes, wines), there are around seven categories to sell on Konga. Commissions start from 3%, among the lowest on all platforms available, though you have to be registered in Nigeria, making it a better bet for local store owners in Nigeria, as a tool to help increase their sales.

9. Sell-SA

Concentrated to electronics, accessories and men’s and women’s fashion, Sell-SA is a large e-commerce store in Africa. It has an interactive mobile app that allows you to talk to your customers directly, while giving you control on other aspects such as pricing and shipping.

There is a free plan, but with higher commission, while paid plans invite lower commissions. Depending on the volume of your sales, you can make your pick. There are other fees involved too, such as payment processing and a payout fee for transferring from the Sell-SA wallet to your bank account.

10. Kilimall

Operating in Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria, Kilimall is a good option for your entry into African e-commerce. They provide sellers with data analytics, marketing support, product management and international shipping options.

There are no listing charges, but there is a commission on sales, as is the norm. You also have to pay for using shipping services, your own packaging and other operational costs.

Conclusion

If the old saying, strike while the iron is hot, is true, then now is the best time to be exploring new markets to export your products to, and new marketplaces to display them. It’s a glorious time to be doing business, because so many more customers now can reach you, no matter which nook and corner of the world your actual shop is in.

The next post, the last in our ongoing series, is online marketplaces to sell on in Australia.

Leave a Reply

avatar

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
Notify of
from purchased

Subscribe Now